Archives for clg04290

Mental Health Resources

As the semester wears on, so does the stress.  Your library staff are aware that college is stressful and that our students face any number of mental health challenges in addition to the usual stress of college. Library staff are collaborating with Wellness Center staff to get trained to help students in distress, and to compile  resources for guidance and education.

Your emotional health and mental health are important as you move through your college years and deserve attention and care, along with your physical health and academic well-being.  We wish our students much success, and much health, of all kinds, and offer these resources for anyone who wants to access guidance or information to learn about attaining and maintaining emotional and mental health.

Mental Health Subject Guide

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Black History Month

The 2020 theme is African Americans and the Vote

From https://africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about:

“The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society.”

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASAALH) started the celebration of Negro History Week in 1926. The week ASAALH chose was the one that contained the birthdays of both Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.  Now they celebrate Black History Month.  (The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) also calls it Black History Month.)

About this year’s theme:

“The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment and the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement. The year 2020 also marks the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) and the right of black men to the ballot after the Civil War. The theme speaks, therefore, to the ongoing struggle on the part of both black men and black women for the right to vote”

From https://asalh.org/project/asalh-announces-2020-black-history-theme-african-americans-and-the-vote/

The CU library’s new book display is a tribute to African Americans’ struggles and a celebration of their contributions to American culture, with an emphasis on prominent individuals, including writers, artists and musicians, and newer books which have garnered awards and considerable recognition. You can see a list of the books included in the display here.

Black History month book display

Books on display for African American History Month

Not everyone is a fan of Black History Month.  In an interview on “60 Minutes” actor Morgan Freeman said, “I don’t want a Black history month. Black history is American history.” You can learn more about this concern in this short video from the PBS Newshour.

https://www.pbs.org/video/pbs-newshour-why-not-everyone-supports-black-history-month/

Since 2016 you can learn more about African American history by visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAHC) in Washington DC, part of the Smithsonian Institution.

Lucky for anyone interested in learning more about African American history, the NMAHC and the library’s book collection–and the vast amount of information on the Internet–are available all 12 months of the year.   See #CharlestonSyllabus and the library’s Race Matters: A Castleton Dialogue guide for links to many more resources.

National Day of Racial Healing

January 21 has been designated a National Day of Racial Healing by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as part of their Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation effort. The American Library Association (ALA) is joining forces on this.

From https://healourcommunities.org/day-of-racial-healing/:

“On Jan. 21, 2020, we invite everyone to join us for the fourth annual National Day of Racial Healing – rooted in experiences for truth telling and trust building that lead to racial healing for a more just and equitable future. Racial healing is not only important, it is essential. Because healing is at the heart of racial equity.”

From ALA:

“The National Day of Racial Healing (NDORH) is an opportunity for people, organizations and communities across the United States to call for racial healing, bring people together in their common humanity and take collective action to create a more just and equitable world.”

More info and to follow:

Also from https://healourcommunities.org/day-of-racial-healing/:

“It is not the responsibility of one person, one group, or even one organization to drive this work. The responsibility belongs to all of us to participate in these honest, powerful and moving experiences and, pursue this journey together. Through racial healing, we can all forge deep, meaningful relationships, lay the groundwork to transform broken systems, and create a world in which, together, we are a new force for positive change.”

The Castleton University Library is compiling relevant resources on a guide called

Race Matters: A Castleton Dialogue

One way to get involved for students, faculty and staff here at CU is to join the public Canvas course CU See Me.  Castleton’s Access and Equity Committee is supporting this campaign to celebrate the diversity of our campus community and encourage curiosity about each other’s stories.

Cookies and Cocoa Study Break

Students, come take a sweet study break in the library!  We’re offering cocoa and cookies to decorate tonight, Monday, December 16, from 5:00 pm until supplies run out.  Come feel the warm support of your library staff, and get creative with frosting and decorations for your cookies if you want.  Bring your friends or make new ones!

Best of luck with finals and happy holidays from your library staff!

Book Sale! Treasures and bargains

Come shop during library hours, through Dec. 20.  We have hundreds of books.  Most are donated to us, some are ones we have de-accessioned (removed) from the library collection.  Many are in like-new condition!

Hardcovers  $1.00 

Paperbacks  .50

 DVDs  $1.00 

Childrens books  .25

Many thanks to those who have donated books to the library.  If you are considering donating books, please read our Gift and Donation Policy.

Best Books of 2019

It’s that festive time of the year! No, not the holidays, the release of best books of the year lists! The New York Times and Washington Post just released their lists of the top 10 notable books of 2019, for example. The CU library has a guide that links to a variety of these lists from book editors, as well as award winners like the National Book Award.

To get your hands on some of these notable books, see books on these lists that the CU library has or has on order, in the library catalog.

Check the Vermont State Colleges libraries’ catalog to locate or request award-winning books, or any books. The Castleton library doesn’t own all of the books on the best books lists, but if there is one you think we should purchase, let us know. To borrow an item owned by the Johnson, Lyndon or Hartness libraries, click on “Place Request (Castleton)” and log in.

Of course there are plenty of books written before 2019. If you need ideas for a good read, try the Books & Authors database. You can browse by genre, or put in the title of a book or name of an author you like and you’ll get recommendations of similar books.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have a stack of books to tuck into!

Mary Franks, Library Enthusiast and Knowledge Seeker

Mary Franks is a senior English major from Maine.

Guest blogger Mary Franks, student worker and library aficionado, reflects on her 4 years working in the library

When I first came to work at the Calvin Coolidge Library, I was a very nervous freshman with big hopes of landing a work study job in a related field to what I wanted to get my masters degree in (Information sciences). The interview went well, though I tried not to get my hopes up. I have had an affinity for libraries for quite some time (being that I am a writer and a notorious bookworm who collects so many books that they began to eat what little space I had left in my room). But, to my delight, I got the job, and began working as an interlibrary loan and periodicals assistant. I would stamp, tag, and organize all things magazine and newspaper. I took the work very seriously, and would constantly ask my boss if my work was neat enough (I wanted to be precise). I have many memories of listening to Vivaldi in one ear as I stamped and tagged in a rhythm (though I couldn’t follow Vivaldi) as snow fell outside the window.

At some point, I wanted to know more, and so I requested cross-training, and began working in Tech Services and learned how to stamp and tag the books to go into the permanent collection, or how to pull the books which were now considered inferior or irrelevant to our patrons. I loved that I got my hands on the new books first before the potential swarms of hands that would pick it up, consider it, and maybe take it home. I loved knowing that, without this job, the books would not be shelf-ready, and I was making them accessible to hundreds of people by giving them their call-number stickers, and stamping them with the Calvin Coolidge stamp so that the reader would know where it belonged (should they be an avid reader and forget from which of the many libraries they got that book). I leaped once again into a new area, leaving the back of the library and interacting directly with patrons at the front desk.

Every job I got my hands on I adored, and wondered if I was the only student who enjoyed her work as much as one would enjoy getting paid to sing or dance or win a sports game. To me, the world of the library is its own puzzle, which is rewarding to solve. Most of the pieces simply require you to keep them aligned for the rest of the puzzle to work. But the real challenge comes when a patron has a question I don’t have an easy answer for, and together we go searching through countless rows of knowledge to find a solution. But, my most favorite was the little talks I had with the brave or friendly strangers who would strike up a conversation about their favorite book, or topic, or genre, and from there we would bounce from one idea to the next until we reached the same conclusion: we both found another person who loves knowledge for the sake of knowledge.

I have now been working at the Calvin Coolidge Library for about four years, and am now working as a reference aide, patiently waiting for questions on papers, research articles, or books to help the hungry minded individual find what they seek. There are many quiet moments when I work, and many lively, which blend and weave together in a series of experiences that I will never forget and for which I am thankful for. I am Mary, library lover and knowledge seeking aficionado. If you need a chat, or are on a hunt for that one golden nugget of truth, let me know, and I will get you the map to it.

Veterans Day 2019

Castleton isn’t taking the day off, but we will be observing Veterans Day 2019 together as a community on Monday, November 11.  Education professor and veteran Deb Waggett will be the guest speaker, in front of Woodruff Hall at 11:00 am.

You can see a selection of books on display in the library reflecting on the state of the U.S. military and the experiences of veterans during their service and after.

For additional resources, see Credo Reference’s Topic Page on Veterans Day.

To better understand soldiers’ and veterans’ experiences, consider reading a memoir.

Open Access Social Science Research

Post by Scott Hertzberg, Reference Librarian

The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) contains more than 888,000 open access, law, economics and other social science papers posted by more than 425,000 scholars (SSRN, Retrieved October 1, 2019). The majority of the articles are “pre-print” articles that have been accepted for eventual publication by established peer-reviewed journals. A very small number of the papers are not peer-reviewed, but to be safe Castleton faculty and librarians should instruct students to check that a specific SSRN paper indicates it has passed a peer review.

The Rochester-based non-profit company that started SSRN in 1994 sold the website to Elsevier in May of 2016 (Van Noordan, 2016). Elsevier has so far abided by a pledge made after the acquisition to continue to keep the papers open access (PIKE, 2016). An article in Information Today suggests that the publisher will continue to do so, and that their real interest is the data produced by SSRN users (Van Noordan, 2016). A Nature article on the acquisition quotes an analyst who called it a “well thought out” strategy to “create deeper relationships with researchers and become more and more essential to researchers even as librarians become less so” (PIKE, 2016). Regardless of ownership, SSRN is a major open access network for scholarly communication in the social sciences.

For more information on Open Access and Open Educational Resources, see the library’s guide:

Open Educational Resources (OER)

Bibliography

Crozier, H. (2018). Promoting Open Access and Open Educational Resources to Faculty. Serials Librarian, 74(1–4), 145–150. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0361526X.2018.1428470.

Pike, G. H. (2016). Elsevier Buys SSRN: What It Means for Scholarly Publication. Information Today, 33(6), 1–29. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/it/jul16/Pike–Elsevier-Buys-SSRN–What-It-Means-for-Scholarly-Publication.shtml.

Salem, J. (2017). Open Pathways to Student Success: Academic Library Partnerships for Open Educational Resource and Affordable Course Content Creation and Adoption. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 43(1), 34–38. Retrieved from https://www-sciencedirect-com.castleton.idm.oclc.org/science/article/pii/S0099133316301409.

Sheret, L., & Harper, L. (2018, July 20). “The Benefits of Open Educational Resources (OERs) for Faculty and Students. Retrieved from https://mds.marshall.edu/lib_faculty/62/.

Thompson, S., Cross, W., Rigling, L., & Vickery, J. (2017). Data-informed open education advocacy: A new approach to saving students money and backaches. Journal of Access Services, 14(3). Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15367967.2017.1333911.

Van Noordan. (2016). Social-sciences preprint server snapped up by publishing giant Elsevier : Nature News & Comment. Nature. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/news/social-sciences-preprint-server-snapped-up-by-publishing-giant-elsevier-1.19932

Xia, J. (2019). A Preliminary Study of Alternative Open Access Journal Indexes | SpringerLink. Publishing Research Quarterly, 35(2), 274–284.

Yeates, S. (2017). After Beall’s “List of predatory publishers”: problems with the list and paths forward. Information Research, 22(4), 1–6. Retrieved from http://www.informationr.net/ir/22-4/rails/rails1611.html.