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Calvin Coolidge Library News & Events

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Database Suggestions and Changes

Note: Lists updated 7/26/2022 to reflect changes to new and continuing databases.

Updating our database collections is always an ongoing process, and we want your input! Please use the Database and Journal Suggestion Form to make recommendations about what databases (or journals) you’d like to see.

We do have a few changes to our existing subscriptions coming up for next year, most of which will be active July 1. Please see below for a list of what’s new, what’s leaving, and what’s staying the same. Please feel free to get in touch with us at the library with any questions, comments, or concerns.

NEW Databases

  • Kanopy

Discontinued Databases

  • BioOne
  • Environment Complete
  • Oxford Music Online
  • SocINDEX with Full Text

Continuing Databases

  • Academic Search Premier
  • Business Source Premier
  • Chronicle of Higher Education
  • CINAHL Plus with Full Text
  • CQ Researcher
  • Credo Reference
  • EBSCO eBooks
  • Education Research Complete
  • ERIC
  • Films on Demand
  • GreenFile
  • Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition
  • HeinOnline
  • Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)
  • JSTOR Arts & Sciences I, II & III
  • Learning Express Library
  • LISTA (Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts)
  • Literary Reference Center Plus
  • MEDLINE
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • NCJRS Abstracts Database
  • New York Times Historical
  • NYTimes.com
  • PLOS
  • ProQuest Central
    • Latin America and Iberia Database
    • ProQuest Arts & Humanities Database
    • ProQuest Education Database
  • Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection
  • PsycArticles
  • PsycINFO
  • Resources for College Libraries
  • Salem Reference Online
  • ScienceDirect: Health & Life Sciences Collection
  • SPORTDiscus
  • Statista
  • WorldCat
  • All databases in the Gale VOL: https://support.gale.com/vol/products

Celebrating Black History Month

The library is celebrating Black History Month this year with a book display on the theme of

Black Stories Matter

The books selected for the display in the library include recent popular and award-winning novels by Black authors, recent popular and award-winning books on the Black experience, like memoirs, books on important or previously neglected figures in Black history and culture, and books informing anti-racism work and education. Please come take a look and check out one of these books and learn from our most celebrated Black authors.

The books in this exhibit represent just a sampling of books we have on these topics in the library. To find more, consult our catalog. Also see a sampling of ebooks on anti-racism education in our EBSCO ebook collection. You can also access a wealth of additional resources on the library’s Race Matters guide, including reading lists and syllabi.

Eliminating racism in our society is the work of all of us. One way to get involved is to educate yourself. Reading is a way to educate yourself without asking people of color to do extra work.

If you are new to learning about racism and white supremacy in the U.S., library staff recommend So You Want To Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo.

An important book on the history of racist ideas in America is Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi. There is an abridged version of the book available, and a version for young readers.

We hope all of you Spartans have an educational Black History Month this year!

Welcome back, Spartans!

And a big welcome to any new Spartans! The library is here for you! You can contact the library to arrange a one-on-one orientation to library resources and services. You can email library@castleton.edu with any questions. You can make an appointment with a librarian here. See our Ask a Librarian page to see all the ways you can get help using the library or get answers to questions you may have while doing research. Use the chat feature on our website to get help from a librarian any time of day or night, 24/7.

We use the Dewey Decimal System to organize our book collection by subject, like school libraries and public libraries. We have a few special sections, like our Casual Collection for recreational reading and self-help books. The stacks are “open,” meaning you can access all the books in the library on your own, with the exception of books professors put on reserve that we keep behind the circulation desk.

We hire work study students, so be in touch to learn more about these positions.

Again, welcome! We hope you’ll stop in and say hi and let us know how we can help you.

Journal Subscription Suggestions and Changes

As with our databases earlier in the year, our journal subscriptions are being updated. Initial changes have been made based on cost and usage statistics. We are maintaining a current list of periodical changes that you are welcome to view. Please note that we also have full text access to many journals through our database subscriptions.

Still, there may be resources (journals or other subscriptions) that you would like to see us retain, or new ones you’d like to see added. We value your input and you can still make recommendations by filling out our Database and Journal Suggestion Form.

If you have any questions or comments, please always feel free to reach out to the library staff.

Shop the Library Book Sale December 5-22

Come check out the bargains on hundreds of books in the library book sale, December 5 – December 22. The library gets donations of books from the community all year long, and we are also “weeding” our own book collection on a regular basis, so we can pass along these books to you for a song! (Not literally–it’s also a fundraiser for the library–but the prices are low!)

  • Hardcovers $1.00 
  • Paperbacks 50 cents
  •  DVDs $1.00 
  • Children’s books 25 cents

Come browse and shop! Grab a last-minute gift or treat yourself with a book for break!!

Best Books of 2022

As the year draws to a close, various book-related publications and news outlets post their picks of the best books of the year. There are also several book awards that choose finalists and winners each year. Your librarians compile these best books of the year lists and award winners on a guide, and also create a link to books from these lists the CU library has ordered or already added to our collection that you can find in our catalog. Take a look to find some of the best reads of the year!

We can’t purchase all the books on these lists, so if you see a book on one of these lists that the CU library doesn’t own, you can request the book through interlibrary loan (for CU students, faculty and staff only) or suggest the library purchase the book.

Of course the library has lots of books not on these lists for you to peruse and find the ones YOU think are best!

Native American Heritage Month

November is designated Native American Heritage Month. From nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov: “The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum all join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans.” You can also read about how Native American Heritage Month came about on this website.

Some other websites dedicated to Native American Heritage Month:

The library is featuring books by and about Native Americans this month. You can read memoirs, novels, histories, children’s books, and more, to learn about the experiences of contemporary and historic Native Americans. See the list of books included here. Some examples:

For those who like to learn through other media, Kanopy has a featured set of films for Native American Heritage Month. And you can read about several new television series featuring indigenous stories in this article from The Guardian.

Also included in the exhibit in the library is a set of 3-D printed replicas of arrow points found around Lake Bomoseen in Castleton, from around 12,000 years ago. They were scanned here at CU’s Innovation Lab, and were donated to the college recently as part of the Benford collection.

First-Generation College Celebration

November 8th is First-Generation College Celebration Day, sponsored by the Center for First-Generation Student Success. From their website:

“Since 2017, institutions, corporations, non-profits, and K-12 schools from across the nation have celebrated first-generation students, faculty, staff, and alumni on November 8 and highlighted the important contributions they make within their communities.”

“Join us in advancing an asset-based national narrative on first-generation student experiences and outcomes. Use November 8 to encourage your communities to better understand the systemic barriers plaguing higher education and the supports necessary for this important and resilient population to continue thriving.”

“November 8 was selected as the date…to honor the anniversary of the signing of the Higher Education Act of 1965…Much like other hallmark legislation of that era, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, HEA was intended to help level a playing field that for too long had been weighed against Americans from minority and low-income backgrounds…Additionally, HEA ushered in programs, particularly the Federal TRIO programs, necessary for post-secondary access, retention, and completion for low-income, potential first-generation college graduates.”

The library has a book display up honoring authors and other accomplished individuals who were in the first generation in their family to go to college. You can see the list of books included here. Of course this is just a tiny sampling of the achievements of this resilient and persistent segment of the college graduate population.

Happy Halloween!

From left to right: Michele Perry holding a photo of Billie Neathawk, Stephanie Traverse, Miranda Axworthy, Charlotte Gerstein

Media Literacy Week

Graphic from MediaWise social media

October 24-28 this year is Media Literacy Week, created to highlight the importance of educating young people and the public about digital media literacy. This topic is vital especially in a democracy, where citizens need to be educated for intelligent civic participation, and is closely connected to information literacy education, a priority in General Education at Castleton.

The organizations promoting Media Literacy Week provide lots of resources for learning more about techniques for critical consumption of media, and for teaching media literacy. Take a look at United States Media Literacy Week from the National Association of Media Literacy Education, Media Smarts from Canada, and MediaWise from the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

The library has a book exhibit up right now featuring related books. You can peruse the list of books included here. You can also see a plethora of resources on a guide created by your CU librarians, News Literacy: Resources for Citizens, Students and Educators

The Soundings program included a presentation this week, “Sorting the News from the Chaff” by Professor Mark Timney from Keene State College.

For students reading this: Do you feel that your K-12 education included enough content on media literacy? Click here to rate your education and share some thoughts.

Media Smarts Canada offers presentation slides and other materials on ways to tell if something is true online. Below is a poster they created, with the four basic steps they emphasize and teach students how to do in their lessons.

With all the resources available and the importance of these skills to us as individuals and as a society–we can all make a difference by gaining in media literacy skills!

New subscription this year: Kanopy for streaming films

What is Kanopy?

From the Kanopy website:

“Kanopy is a video-streaming platform dedicated to thoughtful and thought-provoking films….Kanopy was established to provide academic institutions with essential films that foster learning and conversation, [then later] expanded its services to public libraries, and now delivers a diverse collection of 30,000+ enriching films, available to stream anytime and anywhere — from desktop to TV to tablet…[a] platform for showcasing independent films that fuels lifelong learning, we are on a mission to ensure that everyone has access to enriching films that bridge cultural boundaries, spark discussion, and expand worldviews.”

It includes narrative films and documentaries. You can search for a specific film or director, etc., or browse by type of film or subject, or see lists of award-winners or newly added films.

How to watch Kanopy

First, access Kanopy through this link, or the link in the list of Research Databases on the library website. If you’re off-campus you’ll need to log in using your CU username and password. Then you can make an account. After you’ve made this account, you can use it to access Kanopy through the website or the Kanopy app, and to keep track of your watching and make lists of films or clips of films, etc.

Kanopy is available via an array of apps on the TV, phone, tablet, and computer.

On these mobile devices:

  • iOS devices
  • Android devices
  • Amazon Fire tablets

On these TV devices:

  • Apple TV and Airplay
  • Amazon Fire TV
  • Android TV
  • Samsung Smart TV
  • Roku
  • Telstra TV
  • Chromecast

If you do not have access to any of the above devices, you can also view Kanopy on your television by connecting your computer to your television via HDMI cable.

The Kanopy database also contains some titles we don’t have included in our subscription. However, if you click on one of those and you do want to view it, you can fill out the information under “Request for Access,” and someone will get back to you about access to that additional film.

See Kanopy’s support website for answers to frequently asked questions, or reach out to library staff with any questions.