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Book Sale! Treasures and bargains

Come shop during library hours, through Dec. 20.  We have hundreds of books.  Most are donated to us, some are ones we have de-accessioned (removed) from the library collection.  Many are in like-new condition!

Hardcovers  $1.00 

Paperbacks  .50

 DVDs  $1.00 

Childrens books  .25

Many thanks to those who have donated books to the library.  If you are considering donating books, please read our Gift and Donation Policy.

Best Books of 2019

It’s that festive time of the year! No, not the holidays, the release of best books of the year lists! The New York Times and Washington Post just released their lists of the top 10 notable books of 2019, for example. The CU library has a guide that links to a variety of these lists from book editors, as well as award winners like the National Book Award.

To get your hands on some of these notable books, see books on these lists that the CU library has or has on order, in the library catalog.

Check the Vermont State Colleges libraries’ catalog to locate or request award-winning books, or any books. The Castleton library doesn’t own all of the books on the best books lists, but if there is one you think we should purchase, let us know. To borrow an item owned by the Johnson, Lyndon or Hartness libraries, click on “Place Request (Castleton)” and log in.

Of course there are plenty of books written before 2019. If you need ideas for a good read, try the Books & Authors database. You can browse by genre, or put in the title of a book or name of an author you like and you’ll get recommendations of similar books.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have a stack of books to tuck into!

Mary Franks, Library Enthusiast and Knowledge Seeker

Mary Franks is a senior English major from Maine.

Guest blogger Mary Franks, student worker and library aficionado, reflects on her 4 years working in the library

When I first came to work at the Calvin Coolidge Library, I was a very nervous freshman with big hopes of landing a work study job in a related field to what I wanted to get my masters degree in (Information sciences). The interview went well, though I tried not to get my hopes up. I have had an affinity for libraries for quite some time (being that I am a writer and a notorious bookworm who collects so many books that they began to eat what little space I had left in my room). But, to my delight, I got the job, and began working as an interlibrary loan and periodicals assistant. I would stamp, tag, and organize all things magazine and newspaper. I took the work very seriously, and would constantly ask my boss if my work was neat enough (I wanted to be precise). I have many memories of listening to Vivaldi in one ear as I stamped and tagged in a rhythm (though I couldn’t follow Vivaldi) as snow fell outside the window.

At some point, I wanted to know more, and so I requested cross-training, and began working in Tech Services and learned how to stamp and tag the books to go into the permanent collection, or how to pull the books which were now considered inferior or irrelevant to our patrons. I loved that I got my hands on the new books first before the potential swarms of hands that would pick it up, consider it, and maybe take it home. I loved knowing that, without this job, the books would not be shelf-ready, and I was making them accessible to hundreds of people by giving them their call-number stickers, and stamping them with the Calvin Coolidge stamp so that the reader would know where it belonged (should they be an avid reader and forget from which of the many libraries they got that book). I leaped once again into a new area, leaving the back of the library and interacting directly with patrons at the front desk.

Every job I got my hands on I adored, and wondered if I was the only student who enjoyed her work as much as one would enjoy getting paid to sing or dance or win a sports game. To me, the world of the library is its own puzzle, which is rewarding to solve. Most of the pieces simply require you to keep them aligned for the rest of the puzzle to work. But the real challenge comes when a patron has a question I don’t have an easy answer for, and together we go searching through countless rows of knowledge to find a solution. But, my most favorite was the little talks I had with the brave or friendly strangers who would strike up a conversation about their favorite book, or topic, or genre, and from there we would bounce from one idea to the next until we reached the same conclusion: we both found another person who loves knowledge for the sake of knowledge.

I have now been working at the Calvin Coolidge Library for about four years, and am now working as a reference aide, patiently waiting for questions on papers, research articles, or books to help the hungry minded individual find what they seek. There are many quiet moments when I work, and many lively, which blend and weave together in a series of experiences that I will never forget and for which I am thankful for. I am Mary, library lover and knowledge seeking aficionado. If you need a chat, or are on a hunt for that one golden nugget of truth, let me know, and I will get you the map to it.

Veterans Day 2019

Castleton isn’t taking the day off, but we will be observing Veterans Day 2019 together as a community on Monday, November 11.  Education professor and veteran Deb Waggett will be the guest speaker, in front of Woodruff Hall at 11:00 am.

You can see a selection of books on display in the library reflecting on the state of the U.S. military and the experiences of veterans during their service and after.

For additional resources, see Credo Reference’s Topic Page on Veterans Day.

To better understand soldiers’ and veterans’ experiences, consider reading a memoir.

Open Access Social Science Research

Post by Scott Hertzberg, Reference Librarian

The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) contains more than 888,000 open access, law, economics and other social science papers posted by more than 425,000 scholars (SSRN, Retrieved October 1, 2019). The majority of the articles are “pre-print” articles that have been accepted for eventual publication by established peer-reviewed journals. A very small number of the papers are not peer-reviewed, but to be safe Castleton faculty and librarians should instruct students to check that a specific SSRN paper indicates it has passed a peer review.

The Rochester-based non-profit company that started SSRN in 1994 sold the website to Elsevier in May of 2016 (Van Noordan, 2016). Elsevier has so far abided by a pledge made after the acquisition to continue to keep the papers open access (PIKE, 2016). An article in Information Today suggests that the publisher will continue to do so, and that their real interest is the data produced by SSRN users (Van Noordan, 2016). A Nature article on the acquisition quotes an analyst who called it a “well thought out” strategy to “create deeper relationships with researchers and become more and more essential to researchers even as librarians become less so” (PIKE, 2016). Regardless of ownership, SSRN is a major open access network for scholarly communication in the social sciences.

For more information on Open Access and Open Educational Resources, see the library’s guide:

Open Educational Resources (OER)

Bibliography

Crozier, H. (2018). Promoting Open Access and Open Educational Resources to Faculty. Serials Librarian, 74(1–4), 145–150. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0361526X.2018.1428470.

Pike, G. H. (2016). Elsevier Buys SSRN: What It Means for Scholarly Publication. Information Today, 33(6), 1–29. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/it/jul16/Pike–Elsevier-Buys-SSRN–What-It-Means-for-Scholarly-Publication.shtml.

Salem, J. (2017). Open Pathways to Student Success: Academic Library Partnerships for Open Educational Resource and Affordable Course Content Creation and Adoption. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 43(1), 34–38. Retrieved from https://www-sciencedirect-com.castleton.idm.oclc.org/science/article/pii/S0099133316301409.

Sheret, L., & Harper, L. (2018, July 20). “The Benefits of Open Educational Resources (OERs) for Faculty and Students. Retrieved from https://mds.marshall.edu/lib_faculty/62/.

Thompson, S., Cross, W., Rigling, L., & Vickery, J. (2017). Data-informed open education advocacy: A new approach to saving students money and backaches. Journal of Access Services, 14(3). Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15367967.2017.1333911.

Van Noordan. (2016). Social-sciences preprint server snapped up by publishing giant Elsevier : Nature News & Comment. Nature. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/news/social-sciences-preprint-server-snapped-up-by-publishing-giant-elsevier-1.19932

Xia, J. (2019). A Preliminary Study of Alternative Open Access Journal Indexes | SpringerLink. Publishing Research Quarterly, 35(2), 274–284.

Yeates, S. (2017). After Beall’s “List of predatory publishers”: problems with the list and paths forward. Information Research, 22(4), 1–6. Retrieved from http://www.informationr.net/ir/22-4/rails/rails1611.html.

Vermont Reads March: Book One

Have you read this year’s Vermont Reads book yet?

March: Book One is the true story of U.S. Congressman John Lewis’s youth and early involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, told in graphic formVermont Reads is a program of the Vermont Humanities Council.

Join Vermonters in reading the book, then join library staff for either

Book Discussion

Wednesday, November 13
4:00 pm
Library Media Viewing Room

OR

Wednesday, November 20
6:30 pm
Castleton Free Library
(opposite the end of Seminary St. on Main Street)

The CU library has multiple copies to loan. Ask at the Circulation desk.
(It’s only 121 pages long!)

More about the book:

“It is the first of a trilogy written by civil rights icon John Lewis, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and award-winning graphic artist Nate Powell.

Lewis was chairman of the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and was considered one of the “Big Six” leaders of the civil rights movement. He has served in the US Congress since 1987 and was awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2011.

Book One tells of Lewis’s childhood in rural Alabama, his desire as a young man to be a preacher, his life-changing interactions with Martin Luther King, Jr., and the nonviolent sit-ins he joined at lunch counters in Nashville as a means of undermining segregation.

The narrative continues in subsequent books to tell of the 1963 March on Washington (Book Two) and the march across Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama in 1965 (Book Three). All three volumes illustrate the story of Lewis’s commitment to nonviolent protest in the pursuit of social justice.”

Vermont Humanities Council website

The library also has Book Two and Book Three in the trilogy. Click for more info about those books, the call number and to see if the book is checked out.

For more resources, see a discussion guide from the Anti-Defamation League:

Indigenous Peoples’ Day and Native American Heritage Month

November is Native American Heritage Month, after Vermont celebrated our first official Indigenous Peoples’ Day on October 14, so we are continuing our recognition of our land’s native heritage and the indigenous communities that have survived into the 21st century.

In May of 2019 Governor Phil Scott signed a bill officially replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and issued the proclamation below. (Click on the image for the PDF).  It states, “Vermont recognizes it was founded and built upon lands first inhabited by Indigenous Peoples of this region – the Abenaki, their ancestors and allies – and acknowledges and honors these members of the community.” The federal government still recognizes Columbus Day.

To learn about why states are making this transition, here’s a piece from National Public Radio:  Columbus Day or Indigenous People’s Day?

The library had a book display up in October on relevant topics. Click to see the list of books featured.

For advice on what to read to learn more about Native Americans, here are some bibliographies:

Essential Reading list from First Nations Development Institute

Native American Children’s Literature Recommended Reading List from First Nations Development Institute

You can learn more about the people indigenous to any particular land with a new app and website called Native-Land.ca. Here’s what the whole U.S. looks like with indigenous groups sketched in, below. Click on the image to go to the website and browse, or search by address, to see what tribes were native to any given region.

 

 

 

Banned Books Week

September 22-28 is Banned Books Week.  Why do we celebrate Banned Books Week every year?  It’s a protest against censorship and a reminder that sometimes we need to actively protect intellectual freedom.  According the the American Library Association’s Banned Books Week website, “It brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. ”

What do we mean by a “banned book”? These are books that have been targeted for removal or restriction in libraries and schools.  They aren’t all successfully “banned,” but they have been actively singled out for censorship somewhere in the U.S.

Here are some of the reasons people give for trying to limit access to certain books. (Click on image for larger version).

Here are the most challenged books of 2018.  (Click on image for full-page version.)

Click for full list of books challenged in 2018 (.doc)

Click for a list of the most targeted books year by year

Here’s a short video about censorship and the goals of  Banned Books Week:


You can celebrate Banned Books Week by reading a “banned” book!  See a list in the CU library catalog of the most challenged books of 2017-2018.

Be Part of the Solution: Spartan Climate Action

“Far and away, the greatest threat to the ocean, and thus to ourselves, is ignorance. But we can do something about that.

— Sylvia A. Earle

Library staff are joining others on campus to form Spartan Climate Action, to help inform our community about ways to take action against climate change.  The kick-off event is a rally on September 20, joining the global youth climate strike, minus the striking part.  Dozens of books are currently on display in the library, focusing on solutions to climate change, and what we as individuals can do.  We can all learn and change our behavior, and thus change the culture–and create hope for a less dire future than the one we are headed toward.

For more information, including the demands of the strike action, see Vermont Climate Strike, which we can credit for the image above: https://vermontclimatestrike.org/

Climate Action activities at Castleton:
All are free and open to the public.

Friday Sept 20th from noon – 2 pm
Climate Action Rally. Outside, between Jeffords and Stafford Buildings. Educational and interactive activities centered around climate solutions, making personal climate pledges and calculating your own carbon footprint. Free Food! Live Music!

Thursday Sept 26th from 12:30 to 1:30 pm
Panel Discussion: Green Campus Culture in the Castleton University Library. What can Castleton University learn from Green Mountain College’s Green Campus Culture?

Friday Sept 27th from noon – 2 pm
Global Climate Rally, at the Castleton University Library. Watch Greta Thunberg’s speech to the UN. Educational and interactive activities centered around climate solutions and making personal climate pledges.

Click for a video that captures the energy of the global youth climate strike.

Sign up to get involved.

 

Supporting the new Cannabis Studies program

The library is doing its part to support Castleton’s new Cannabis Studies Certificate program.  We have been purchasing relevant books in consultation with program coordinator Phil Lamy, and we’ve created a new resource guide.  See a handful of recently purchased books.  You might notice that several of these are checked out.  It is a popular topic.

We’re currently highlighting relevant books in a display in the library as a welcome to guests coming to campus for a conference on Friday, Sept. 13, from 1:00-5:30 pm, with time for socializing afterward, called “Cannabis: The Vermont Way.”  The conference celebrates the launch of the new certificate program at CU.


For more information on the conference
:
https://www.castleton.edu/academics/certificate-programs/cannabis-studies-certificate/cannabis-studies-conference-2019/

For more information on the new Cannabis Studies Certificate program:
https://www.castleton.edu/academics/certificate-programs/cannabis-studies-certificate/