Group Work: The Agonies – and the Possibilities

You’ve started dreading Biology. Your lab partner is nice enough, but she doesn’t do much. You have to ask her to help with the task itself, and she texts her boyfriend while you prepare the lab report. You try to get her to contribute, but she always says, “I don’t know” and copies whatever you write.

Then there’s Business Management. In groups of four, you’re working on your final project: a plan for a new business. The assignment constitutes 30% of your grade, so you want to do a good job. You’re also excited about applying the concepts you’ve been studying in class. But one guy has already appointed himself CEO of your fledgling corporation. He’s not interested in your ideas; in fact, he doesn’t let anyone do very much. This is just fine with one member of your group who is delighted to be off the hook. But two of you are getting frustrated: it’s your education, too!

If you’re a student, you know the perils of group work. Since kindergarten, you’ve also heard teachers rave about the importance of working with others.

Like it or not, collaboration is part of the academic and professional world. After graduation, you will have to contend with other people – even if you work from home, run your own business, or pursue a freelance career. Often, your colleagues will be warm, supportive, and inspiring. Sometimes, you will find yourself with a lazy, stubborn, or overbearing co-worker. You’ll have to contend with these situations without clenching your teeth, compromising your health, or leaving your position.

Here are some tips to make group projects less stressful:

1.) Set Boundaries: Before you get started, delegate tasks. Determine who is responsible for each part of a project and set deadlines. This can be casual: “I’ll answer questions one and three if you do two and four.” With larger projects, you may want to establish more formal requirements: “Rick will write the Procedures section, Liana the Analysis, and Chelsea the Recommendations. We’ll meet to discuss our drafts a week before the paper is due.” Get these arrangements in writing – or save e-mail correspondence about them – so that there is no confusion about responsibilities.

2.) Be the Teammate You Want. Don’t be lazy, don’t be disparaging, and don’t take over. It’s normal to be frustrated when the material is difficult or when your partners’ standards are different than yours. If you’re struggling with the project, get help – from your professor, classmates, or the Academic Support Center. If you find yourself with well-intentioned, but less skilled group members, help them succeed. For example, if your partner is not a strong writer, you might proofread his work and tactfully make suggestions. You might also refer him to the Writing Clinic. When he does something well, tell him so.

3.) Document Everything. Keep track of who attends meetings and contributes to the project. If a teammate isn’t pulling his or her own weight, you will be able to bring specific grievances to the professor. Use this option as a last resort: only approach your instructor after you have talked with your group member. If you must complain about a classmate, be professional. Don’t tattle or rant. Instead, express your concerns in a well-written e-mail, and attach any documentation you have.

4.) Put Your Project in Perspective. Sometimes, this means writing the lab report yourself if you want a good grade in the course. At other times, you’ll have to shrug off your lackluster discussion group. Weigh each assignment to determine how much time you want to spend nurturing group dynamics.

Regard difficult group work as you would any other obstacle: a chance to prove to yourself and your professors that you have the maturity and determination to overcome a challenge. Take a deep breath, and tell yourself that you’re developing skills you’ll use the rest of your life.

-Dorothy A. Dahm

How to Be a Study Smartypants

You just got done with your 9am, don’t have class again for another hour, and all that is on your mind is food. Huden here you come for breakfast. By the time you’re done eating, you only have another 20 minutes until class, which is all the way in Leavenworth, so you think, eh, I will just hang here until class.

Well, now it is 11:50, and your next class is at 2pm.  You need a nap, your bed, and maybe some Netflix. They all sound real good right now.  So, of course, that is what you do for the next few hours.

After your 2:00-3:50 class, you’ll go straight to the library.

It is now 4, and you have 100 texts from your roommate asking you to go to Rutland with her real quick. In your head, you’re like OMG yes, then wait, library. Then you decide okay, I will to go to the library right when I get back.

After Rutland, you need some dinner, so meal exchange at Fireside sounds good for the night. But it is now 7pm.

Your night ends with you going back to your room because it is so late, and getting just a little work done in bed. Then, of course, Netflix and social media will take over once again.

Sound all too familiar? Here are some tips to get things done.

1.) Make a Schedule: At the beginning of each day, make a schedule of your whole day, hour by hour. This will give you a plan to follow so you won’t need to make a last-minute decision you’ll regret later.

2.) Bring Everything: Bringing everything you need to work on or study allows you to be productive during those 20 extra minutes you hang out in Huden. Tell yourself what you are realistically going to get done in the time you have, even if it is something small.

 3.) Eat and Study: Go grab breakfast, lunch, or dinner in Fireside or the Coffee Cottage and bring it to the library. Work and eat at the same time. After your 9am, you’ll have almost an hour to get work done or study.

 4.) Say NO: It is okay to say no to your roommate and Rutland. You had a plan and you ignored it. And definitely regretted it.

Once you make your plan, follow it. You always have the right intentions; just make sure your actions reflect them.

-Alyson Tully

Alyson Tully graduated from Castleton University in May 2018 with a degree in multidisciplinary studies. 

T.I.M.E: Some Tips for Starting Your College Career

 

See the source image

You will learn by the end of your college career that your time spent at school is more than just your classes and homework. The skills you learn in college, inside and outside of the classroom, will carry over into your professional and personal lives after graduation. An acronym all college students should know is T.I.M.E.

1.) Time management can be very difficult for many students. There are 168 hours in week, 2688 of them in a sixteen-week semester of college. About a week, maybe two, of breaks. 12 to 18 hours per week will be spent in the classroom, then two to three times that should be spent studying for those classes, then, if you’re lucky, 56 hours for sleep, a few hours for eating… you get the idea. You’re left with only a few hours during the week to do what you please. One of my high school teachers gave me advice I still cherish. As we waited for the bell of our final high school class, she said, “When you go to college, you can do three things: you can study, you can party, and you can sleep, but you can only do two of the three things.”

2.) Involvement. Do it. Get involved. Turn off Netflix and Facebook, go outside, and throw a Frisbee. Go outside and lay in the grass or by the pool. Talk with students who live in other dorms. Close friendships that are made in dorms are important and worth holding onto, but remember life exists outside of your hallway or your suite. Join your student government, or your major’s club, or a volunteer club, or do all three. If you commute, stay for a weekend here and there. Make friends other than your parents and siblings, as well as whatever dogs, chickens, goats, or hedgehogs you might have— all of which I had when I commuted to community college.

Volunteer, tutor, join a team, join a club, join another club. Fill your week, but remember to save time for yourself and time to socialize. If you have a hard time making friends, go to your school’s cafeteria, sit down with some people you haven’t met before, and ask them five questions: What’s your major? What year are you in school? Where are you from? Do you have any pets? Do you have a job? Do you play any sports?

3.) Movement. Simply, move. Playing sports takes care of this one. Some of us don’t participate in sports, so go to the gym. It’s not as scary as it sounds. If you’re nervous like most other people, go with a friend, or ask someone to be a “brofessor” and show you what it’s all about. Still not convinced? Go outside like you did to cure your Netflix addiction. Most colleges have somewhere you can walk where you can feel safe and unjudged. You don’t have to walk for miles, but once you feel the enlightenment of the outdoors, you’ll never want to go inside again. Learn to ski or snowboard, ride a bike, swim, do something other than sitting down.

4.) Education is the reason you are going to college, so study skills are important. If you missed out on study techniques in high school, go to the Academic Support Center and ask for some help—immediately. Unless you are one of those students who doesn’t study for anything, yet somehow gets good grades, you need to know how to study. (And even if this worked for you in high school, it won’t serve you well in college.)

Part of navigating – and enjoying – college is learning to communicate with faculty. TALK with your teachers. Talk with them face-to-face, by e-mail, phone, letter, even carrier pigeon. Although you may believe otherwise, they are people; they do not turn off like a robot as soon as class is dismissed. Get to know a few. Attend a social gathering where teachers are invited without some sort of grade stipulation.

If you only take away one thing from this post, let it be this: you only have so much time while you’re in college. Remember to spend it wisely.

– D. Austin Martineau

D. Austin Martineau is a recent graduate of Castleton University with a degree in English and Secondary Education.

Finals, Summer, Then What?

In a few days, Spring 2019 will be over. You’ll finish your finals, turn in any last papers, and go home. We hope you’ve had a good semester and wish you a relaxing summer. You deserve it!

We also hope you reflect a bit on the semester and think about the one ahead. Just as the New Year allows you to make a fresh start, a new academic year gives you a clean slate. No matter what happened this spring – a bad grade, poor decisions, a failed class, a list of failures – you can overcome it. Really!

First, consider this semester’s successes. Maybe you found that you were better at math or writing than you thought you were. Perhaps you discovered a love for film studies, Spanish, or botany. In any case, you learned something about your strengths and interests.

Second, identify what you did wrong. No, you don’t need to beat yourself up. Just acknowledge your mistakes calmly as though you were talking about someone else’s life. For example, say, “I left my papers to the last minute, so they weren’t as strong as they should have been” or “I let my social life distract me from my studies.”

Next, think about what you gained from the experience. Maybe you learned something about time management or study skills. You may have discovered something about yourself and your interests: perhaps teaching is not the career for you. Use this insight to move forward even if you’re not quite sure of your path.

Finally, realize you’re not alone. Many of your peers and professors have had low periods – and recovered from them. All of us have struggled – academically, personally, or professionally. Successful people aren’t the ones who’ve never stumbled; they’re the ones who’ve continued on anyway.

Have a wonderful summer! We’re already looking forward to seeing you in the autumn.  

-Dorothy A. Dahm

 

 

Finals Week: Survive, Thrive, and Celebrate!

See the source image

It hardly seems possible, but in just over three weeks, the semester will be over. Chances are, you’re excited about break – and can’t wait until finals are behind you. After all, Exam Week means study sessions during which you cram for finals and churn out one capstone essay after another.

Being nervous about the semester’s end is normal. But staying up all night to review notes and finish assignments isn’t healthy or effective. When you’re sleep-deprived, your brain doesn’t work as well, so you don’t absorb as much information as you would if you were rested. You also make careless errors. (All of us at Academic Support teach, and we recognize the work you finish at 4 am. Trust us.)

But if you’re not staying up all night to get through Finals Week, how will you finish your work? Fortunately, you can sail through the end of the semester without losing your sleep or sanity. Here are some tips to keep you focused during exams:

1.) Start Early; Break It Up. Many people begin shopping for the holidays long before December 1st. You should start studying for exams well in advance of Finals Week. Review your notes and previous tests, if applicable, for 10-20 minutes each day. This way, the information will be fresh and firm in your mind. Also, divide writing assignments into manageable chunks. You might create an outline one day, write a rough draft the next day, and revise your essay the day after that.

2.) Prioritize. Yes, being a college student means juggling a lot of commitments: classes, activities, part-time work, a social life, and family. And the end of the semester, combined with the holidays, can amplify these obligations. That’s why now, more than ever, you need to remind yourself of why you’re here. Promise yourself you’ll enjoy an outing with friends – after you finish your sociology take-home exam.

3.) Take Care. Telling yourself you’ll be able to relax after Finals can propel you through a tough week. However, don’t save all of your treats for the holidays. Schedule short breaks during Exam Week to exercise, connect with friends or family, or simply curl up with a book or movie. Making room for fun keeps you healthy and motivated; it’s also a valuable time management skill.

4.) Be Grateful. Let’s face it: if you’re in a position to fret about finals, you’re a pretty lucky person. Lots of people, in the US and overseas, cannot access higher education. When the assignments multiply and stress piles up, take a deep breath. Remind yourself of how privileged you are to be able to study something you love and pursue the life you want.

Finals Week doesn’t have to mean sleepless nights, too much caffeine, and harried students. As the year draws to a close, use this time to reflect on how much you’ve learned and celebrate how far you’ve come.

-Dorothy A. Dahm

Teaching and Trailblazing: Meet TRIO Star Sarah Dunbar

When Sarah Dunbar first enrolled at Castleton University, the campus seemed a long way from Craftsbury Common, her hometown in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. She missed her family and friends, and as she didn’t have a car, she was dependent on other people for rides off campus. And although she’d participated in Upward Bound, a college-readiness program, in high school, the first-generation student occasionally doubted her ability to succeed in college.

At Castleton, Sarah found a home away from home in the Academic Support Center (ASC). Through the Summer Transition Program, Sarah met Director of Academic Services Kelley Beckwith and other academic counselors. They helped her select classes, manage her time, and navigate financial aid options. She sought tutoring from the ASC’s Math and Writing Clinics. She even found part-time employment as a Learning Center Assistant, scheduling appointments and assisting staff with administrative projects. And even when she didn’t have a particular reason to visit the ASC, it proved an ideal place to study. “It’s the right environment to focus,” she remarks.

Outside of the ASC, Sarah found success in the classroom, earning all As her first semester at Castleton. Slowly, she started branching out, joining various clubs on campus.

ASC staff noticed a change in her. “When Sarah first came to Castleton, she was on the shy side and a bit underconfident,” says Kelley Beckwith. “That quickly changed as her success in the classroom emerged. She then began challenging herself in other ways.”

Today, it’s hard to remember Sarah ever doubted her ability to thrive in college. The senior multidisciplinary studies major has a 3.83 GPA. During her time at Castleton, she’s visited St. John and Iceland through travel-study courses. In addition to serving as the Vice President of Academics in the Student Government Association, she is involved with the Student Education Association and the Rotaract Club. She has also served as a Community Advisor, mentoring students in the residence halls.

Sarah freely admits that juggling her various pursuits can be challenging. “I made sure the things I wanted to do really counted,” she says. “Yes, they look good on a résumé, but they served a purpose personally and professionally.”

Despite her many commitments, Sarah has found time to give back to TRIO and the ASC. In addition to working as a Learning Center Assistant, she has served as a Writing Clinic tutor and a TRIO Program Assistant. In these roles, she has mentored and sometimes counseled other first-generation students. “I like knowing I’m helping a student who is in the same position I was when I first started,” she says.

But don’t count on Sarah to start dispensing advice. She takes a far more laidback approach to mentoring. “When I’m the mentee, I want to feel free to make mistakes,” she explains. “Our conversations should be a two-way street. I have as much to learn from my students as they do from me.”

After graduation, Sarah hopes to teach elementary school in Vermont. Eventually, she intends to earn a master’s degree in education. “I’m fortunate to have found something I can see myself doing for the rest of my life,” she says. “Castleton made me fall in love with teaching.”

Sarah hopes other students will embrace adventure in their college journeys. “Be a trailblazer,” she urges. “Trying new things will be scary at first, but you’ll never know if you like them until you give them a go. And you’ll never know what you’re capable of until you try.”

-Dorothy A. Dahm

Saving Money this Summer: Yes, It’s Possible!

Beautiful woman with a laptop on the beach

For many college students, summer means making money. They work long hours during their vacation to earn money for the academic year. However, summer brings temptations of its own, including the urge to spend! Fortunately, with a little planning, you can enjoy the summer without losing all your savings.

1.) Fun = Free or Almost Free. You don’t need to plan extravagant outings to create memories with your friends and family. Many towns offer free outdoor concerts, festivals, and theater performances during the summer; check out your local newspaper for information about upcoming events. In addition, you can hike or swim at local or state parks for little or nothing.

2.) There’s always a cheaper option. Lunch and breakfast are less pricey than dinner; picnics and potlucks are less expensive than eating out. Matinees are cheaper than evening movies, DVD rentals and Netflix are even less expensive, and your local library will allow you to borrow DVDs for free. There’s nothing wrong with the odd splurge, but make sure your “treats” are occasional and special – otherwise, they’re not splurges, but reckless spending.

3.) Think daytrips, not vacations. Check out destinations – amusement parks, nature trails, museums, and events – within a four-hour drive of your home. If you don’t have to stay overnight, you’ll save money on meals and hotel fare.

4.) Keep it separated. Most adults have a checking account, which they use to pay their bills, and a savings account, which constitutes their savings. If you haven’t opened a savings account, now is the time. Allocate a certain amount of money to your savings account every pay period. You’ll be less likely to spend the money if it’s separate from the rest of your income.

5.) Do your financial aid homework. Even if you’re working a lot, you probably have extra time on your hands during the summer. Use some of it to research scholarship options for the next academic year. Check out Fastweb, College Board, and org to research scholarships. You may have to spend hours filling out applications and writing essays. Regard this the way you would any other job: something you have to do to earn money.

6.) Stay focused. Remind yourself of why you’re in college and what you hope to be one day. Saving money in the present will be much easier if you remember the future you want. While you’re at it, start taking steps toward your goal. You’ve probably heard about how crucial internships are for recent graduates. If you don’t have an internship lined up for this summer, use your downtime to research internship opportunities for the academic year or following summer. You might also request informational interviews with people who are working in your field.

Summer doesn’t have to mean having to choose between work and pleasure. With some mindfulness, you can a fun and frugal, relaxing and inspiring season that prepares you for the next academic year and the career you want.

-Dorothy A. Dahm

 

Procrastination Station: How to Leave the Station and Get to Your Destination

We all procrastinate. With an endless mess of papers to write and exams to study for it can be especially difficult to get going. But it isn’t impossible. Here are a few tips to get your brain train back on track and out of the station.

1.) Make a done list of everything that you need to do. Write down everything you have to do whether you need to do laundry or write a paper for your English class. Write it all down. Now, you may be asking, “isn’t it supposed to be a to do list?” Let me explain. Anyone can write a to do list, but making a done list gives your list purpose and implies that, by the end of the day, some of the things on your list will be done.

2.) Now that you have your list, cross items off of it. Find an item or two on your list that isn’t urgent and cross it right out. I find that every time I make a done list, I write down every single thing that is on my mind. I even write down things that I don’t need to do right away that can be saved for later. When I cross those items off, my list becomes more manageable, and I have more time to work on the projects that actually matter.

3.) Start easy. Work on one of the less menacing tasks on your list first. By starting in on your work, even if it is only on the simpler assignments, you are making progress. Before you know it, you will be through a few items on your list and will be that much closer to relaxation.

4.) Take a break. Did you write your eight-page paper? Did you clean your room? Did you finish one of the bigger projects that you had on your list? If you have, reward yourself with a few minutes of break time. Get up and stretch, have a snack, or go for a short walk. Just be sure to set a timer for when you need to get back to work (and stick to it!).

Finally, keep in mind that not everything can be done in one day. Maybe you’ve tackled half of your list and need to save the rest for tomorrow. That’s okay. After all, the whole point of this process was only to get started, right? If you’re already on your way to completing your list, you’re on time (perhaps even ahead of schedule) and will be at your destination before you know it!

Good luck!

-Sarah Dunbar

Sarah Dunbar is a senior majoring in Multidisciplinary Studies at Castleton University

Get Experience, Get Ahead: Why You Need an Internship

You’re probably in college because you want a career after graduation. But to find a position, you need relevant experience – and how do you get experience if you haven’t had a job in your field?

You get an internship, of course. Internships allow you to learn about a particular industry, develop new skills, gain real-world experience, and explore possible career paths. Often, college students can earn academic credit for internships. Recent graduates with at least one internship under their belt increase their chances of obtaining full-time employment: “Employers are much more likely to interview and hire those with work-related experience,” says Renée Beaupre-White, Director of Career Services at Castleton University.

So if internships are so valuable, how do you get one? Here are some tips to help you find the right opportunity for you:

1. ) Start Looking. To learn about opportunities, meet with Renée in Career Services. Once she learns about your major, interests, and career goals, she can suggest possible sites. You should also talk to your professors, family, and friends. Once they know you are looking for a job or internships, they may be able to connect you with people at various organizations. Finally, be sure to visit the Career and Graduate School Fair on March 19h in Glenbrook Gymnasium.

2. ) Aim High. Have your heart set on a particular company or organization? “Go for it!” Renée advises. She advises calling the organization to find out to whom you should send your résumé and cover letter.

Do know, however, that while most internships are unpaid, many come with a price tag. You may have to pay for housing, food, and transportation while you gain experience with that trendy advertising agency or cool not-for-profit. Still, Renée advises students to pursue these opportunities. “Sometimes, it means working a part-time job at night so you can afford to have that internship,” she says. “It it will be worth it in the end.” Renée also helps students make their dreams reality. She recalls a student who landed a coveted internship at Ms. Magazine, but feared she wouldn’t be able to afford living in Los Angeles. Renée found a graduate of the college who was happy to let the student sleep on her coach for duration of the internship. “Alumni generally want to help,” says Renée.

3.) Apply Early. Early birds really do get the worm! Renée recommends applying for summer internships between January and April – the earlier the better, especially for competitive organizations. Looking for an internship during the academic year? Apply six to eight weeks prior to the start of the semester.

4.) Be Professional. Work with Renée to perfect your résumé and cover letter and proofread them carefully: careless typos could stand between you and the opportunity of a lifetime! She can also help you prepare for interviews and format professional e-mails. After you’ve submitted your application, follow up with the organization to indicate your strong interest in the position. “Be persistent, but professional,” advises Renée. “If the company’s website says no phone calls, then don’t call. Be sure to follow the parameters.”

So you spend hours perfecting your résumé and cover letter, exploring possible internships, and practicing for interviews.  When you finally land an internship, you may feel like celebrating – and you should. But it’s important to remember that being an intern is like having an extended interview. Here’s how you can make a good impression on your internship supervisors:

1.) Stay Professional. “Speak properly to your supervisor and the team: do not use swear words, slang, or gossip,” says Dilan Clements. A December 2016 graduate of Castleton University, Dilan did her internship at Dartmouth’s Weight and Wellness Center. “And just as you dressed nicely for the interview, you should continue to dress appropriate for the position once the internship begins,” she adds. “It’s important to remain professional and businesslike for the duration of the internship.”

2.) Be Flexible – and Expect Challenges. Agree to help with projects and tasks even if they were not part of your initial job description. That includes making photocopies and coffee. “Say yes to everything as no will never move you,” stresses Rénee.  Also, anticipate that you may receive less structure and oversight than you have been accustomed to you in your college classes. Dilan recalls her supervisor asking her to create handouts, but providing little context aside from the topic. She had to research the subject, pull out relevant information, and determine the handout’s structure and layout herself. “In college, projects and assignments are broken down step by step,” says Dilan. “This was a great opportunity for me because it pushed me out of my comfort zone and taught me how to plan and conduct research on my own.”

3.) Network and Learn. “Treat your internship like your first professional job,” says Renée.” Know that the people you meet through your internship can teach you a lot about the organization and the field.: “Ask as many questions as you need to you,” adds Dilan. “The professionals at your internship are there to help you and teach you.” Connections you make during your internship can also help you find employment after graduation. And in some cases, internships lead directly to offers of paid employment. At the end of January, Dilan will start work as a clinical scribe at Dartmouth’s Department of Plastic Surgery. She looks forward to working with “a friendly, knowledgeable, and prestigious group of professionals” and to increasing her knowledge of the health care field.

Both Renée and Dilan encourage current Castleton students to do at least one internship during their undergraduate years. “Just do it!” advises Rénee. “You’ll gain valuable experience in your field, make connections, have greater career confidence, and just might land a job.”

Dilan urges students to take advantage of Rénee’s warmth and expertise. “I truly believe I would not have gotten the internship without Renée’s help,” she says. “She supported and encouraged me through every step.”

-Dorothy A. Dahm

 

 

Grad School: Should You Go?

students-reading-in-libraryMaybe you’ve been thinking about it since you started college. Maybe you’ll need an advanced degree to enter your field. Maybe you’re a senior, and you’re wondering what comes next.

At some point during your time at Castleton, you’ve probably considered graduate school.

A graduate degree can help you advance in a particular career or even enter a new field. In a master’s or doctoral program, you will learn from experts in your field and conduct research in your area of interest. Armed with your new credential, you will enter the job market ready to command a higher salary.

So graduate school is a great idea. Except when it isn’t.

There are two good reasons to pursue graduate school:

1.) You have a passionate desire to conduct research in a very specific area of your discipline: for example, you may want to explore a particular author’s work or the lifecycle of a species of grasshopper.

2.) You are committed to entering a profession or advancing in it.

However, students often pursue graduate school for the wrong reasons. Here are some:

1.) “I don’t know what to do next.”

2.) “My dad wants me to become a doctor, lawyer, physical therapist, or MBA.”

3.) “I’ve always done well in school, I love learning, and I really don’t know what to do next.”

4.) “The economy isn’t good. If I’m in school, I won’t have to get a job for a couple more years.”

Yes, job-hunting is scary. Yes, parental pressure can be overwhelming. Yes, having the opportunity to learn is among the greatest privileges we enjoy. But graduate school demands even more focus and commitment than an undergraduate program. It’s not enough to love history: you must have intense interest in a certain period, enough to write 20,000 or even 100,000 words about that topic.
And do you really want to spend two, four, or six years of your life and maybe go into debt to pursue something that doesn’t excite you?

If you’ve decided graduate school is right for you, support is available on campus. Your professors can offer insight about programs in your field. All of us at Academic Support and Career Services are also happy to help you with the application process. We’ll even explain how you can further your education without accumulating more debt.

If you’re worried about what comes next, schedule an appointment with Career Services. Renée Beaupre-White, Director of Career Services, will be happy to discuss your options and help you fine-tune your resume. And your choices aren’t limited to work or further education: you can explore internships or volunteer opportunities. These experiences can increase your chances of obtaining a paid position. They also provide something even more valuable: clarity about what you do want to do with your life. Who knows? After a year or two or ten, you may be ready to apply to graduate school.

-Dorothy A. Dahm